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Archive for the ‘science fiction art’ Category

Yes, that’s the title to a Warren Zevon song.

I miss Warren.  More than anything, I miss the new songs he’d be producing now.

He never knew it, but his discography (along with Tom Petty’s) served as the go-to source for inspirational songs for my paintball team, the Werewolves.  Werewolves of London was the team’s theme song and its last line – ‘Draw Blood!’ (which we all shouted as loudly and nastily as we could) often preceded our first game at a tournament.  From the reactions, we’re pretty sure it had the desired effect on our opponents.

Lawyers, Guns and Money was another good song for the ‘Wolves, as were Petty’s Won’t Back Down and Free Falling.

Not that I’ll spend any more time on this subject at least right now, but as I think about it, I realize now how important music was to the paintball tournament scene.

I chose Zevon’s title for my title because I’m still in desperation mode – but some major progress has been made.  I’ve finally managed to finish the re-do of all of the individual image pages on the SF pulp magazine checklist.  349 images, 349 anchors, 349 titles…

I think it looks pretty good if I do say so myself – but you can say so for yourself if you go on over to the site and check it out here.

I’ve got one remaining section to do over there, the history pages (displaying all related titles on one page).  Once that’s completed, you’ll be able to click from image to image in all of the magazine sections of the site.

I figure a couple of days, as there aren’t nearly as many history images as there are individual magazine images.

Once that’s done, I can finish up the Chandler Concordance page re-dos and the whole site will be ‘new’.  Then back to tackling the wordpress transfer.

“I can hear the air conditioner hum.  It goes hmmmmm hmmmmm…..”

***

Hey, just noticed the add in to SFFix’s blogroll.  Thanks guys!

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Headline pretty much says it all. 

We’ll start with Obama.  Afterall, he was pretty easy to pick a cover for. Yes, I know the painting was done as a white guy.  Not my fault. I’ve yet to find a Hawaiin depicted on the cover of a pulp magazine so this one will just have to do -

If I had wanted to go with a ‘black’ theme, I could have used this one -

But it really doesn’t convey the sense of strength, courage, fortitude, intelligence and leadership that I was looking for.

Biden was pretty easy -

Almost kind of even looks like him.

And now the moment I’m sure you’ve all been waiting for – the Palin covers.  (Who?  McCain? Oh yeah, the Republican Presidential candidate.  He’s still around?  Huh.)

In choosing these particular covers, I paid as much attention to the imagery (it needed to be a brunette on the cover and they’re just not as common as blondes.  Speaking of which: do we change the blonde jokes to feature brunettes instead or convince Sarah that she really IS a blonde and should get a dye job?) as I did to the names of the stories listed on the covers.  You ought to also.

This is how the Republican party would have us see her – democratic meat dripping from her claws.

Reality is so harsh sometimes, isn’t it?

…get elected. Ha ha ha.

I don’t think Isaac would have wanted to grope this particular femme fan. 

The Imposter.  LOL. LOL.

Empire of Evil. Yep. That’s what we’ll be getting…

An Empire of Evil that will leave a Legacy of Terror.  Fortunately for all of us, Obama has transformed himself into a giant black ant.

“I was once a beauty queen, you know. And I’m sooo smart – I went to six different colleges.  Hey, is that Putin invading my airspace over there?  Oh, no, it’s just dinosaurs strolling across the bridge to nowhere with human beings. You’d think they’d cover that in one of the many newspapers I read every day. But they write about dumb stuff like Supreme Court decisions no one can remember the names of. Stupid Supremes, they should never have broken up. Hey, wanna go wolf shooting from my helicopter while we patrol the border?”

Ok, here’s one for McCain -

Kelly, why do all of the socks look like an old man’s ball sack?

The Conservative.  Yeah.

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SCWIPs – Scatily Clad Women In Peril.  The stuff pulp magazine covers are made of.

For a whole variety of different reasons, the following cover from the very first issue (and only one of two issues ever published) of TOPS IN SCIENCE FICTION, a pretty low-class reprint pulp.

Tops in Science Fiction Spring 1953

Tops in Science Fiction Spring 1953

Why is THIS the number one SCWIP of all time?  Because it has got ALL the necessary elements.

Despite the fact that it’s not very good art – even by pulp magazine standards – this image says it all.

First. there’s a real B.E.M. right there – tentacles and all.

That Bug Eyed Monster has been caught in the unnatural act of ravaging a female human being – not only unnatural, but unholy – unbiblical even!

There’s a hero on there desperately trying to save that woman from a FATE WORSE THAN DEATH (need I mention that this picture was probably the origin for tentacle hentai?) using some kind of truly scientifictional ray rifle and

That woman is wearing the absolutely mandatory brass brassiere!  We know she’s a blonde because she’s not wearing a space helmet. Just a brass brassiere and a long, slinky skirt that’s starting to reveal just a leeetle too much thigh, thighs that are nicely shown off by her fetching brass-buttoned calf-length boots.

And just barely visible in the foreground is the spaceship that femme fatale is being plucked from like a pimento being sucked from an olive.

Folks, it just doesn’t get any more SCWIPy than that!

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I am fully engaged in:

finishing up a short story

developing a new web site

cleaning up the current web site (seems a bunch of the image files got corrupted somehow)

and taking a crash course in mysql/php (or at least decent front end programs for those activities)

As a result, my blogging activities will be a bit curtailed over the next several days.

For those who may not remember, SCWIPs are Scantily Clad Women In Peril. SCWIPs are a frequent occurrence on pulp magazine covers, and not just SF pulps.  Detective and Hero pulps have quite a few also.

I apologize if the subject seems a bit gender-biased.  I suppose if I were bent in a different direction I’d be doing SCMIPs, but first I’d have to come up with a better acronym.   DIMs? (Denuded Imperiled Men. If you think working up an acronym is hard, try finding cover pics to go with it…)

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The article you are looking for can be found HERE on the new version of my blog.

Please update your links and RSS readers.  Thank you.

 

I’m not entirely sure if you can call a Post 1950s SF magazine a ‘pulp’, except in the broader sense of continuing the tradition.  And since I’m continuing the tradition of magazine cover spaceships, I’ll let myself slide a bit on the historical inaccuracy.  You guys shouldn’t worry too much – just enjoy the pictures.

Startling Stories May 1951

Startling Stories May 1951

If ever there was a recognizable pulp magazine cover, this one is it.  I don’t think there’s a single visual history of the SF magazine that doesn’t feature this one.  And the babe is a BABE.  The ship isn’t bad either.

Galaxy September 1952

Galaxy September 1952

Whenever I see an illustration for something from the well-informed mind of Willy Ley I wonder – what happened?  Willy was like Werner von Braun’s explainer, a science popularizer the equal of Carl Sagan. I love this pic: it illustrates what could be – not what ‘might’ have been.

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Ficton December 1954

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Ficton December 1954

Ahhh, Chesley Bonestell, from his series of space exploration images.  The vision is astounding, the detail incredible.  I wish someone had produced a Bonestell-in-space playset.

If October 1955

If October 1955

I like it when SF artists go unconventional with their ship designs – you can only be thrilled by cylindrical submarines in space so many times before it wears thin.  These ships are very reminiscent of Kubrick’s 2001 moonbus.

Galaxy May 1957

Galaxy May 1957

The lost spaceship.  Hidden away in the jungle (or buried in the sand, frozen in the ice, lying on the bottom of the ocean…) for decades, if not centuries.  Can you think of anything cooler that discovering an abandoned spaceship?  I can.  Getting to go inside…

Satellite February 1957

Satellite February 1957

Building your spaceship out of an asteroid is just the ultimate in SF fiscal responsibility. 

Amazing Science Fiction April 1959

Amazing Science Fiction April 1959

The crash at the rocket field.  If you look closely underneath the ship, you can see a figure that appears to be trying to hold the ship up.  That’s not gonna work, buddy.

The Original Science Fiction Stories February 1959

The Original Science Fiction Stories February 1959

I said I liked unconventional.  This is about as outlandish as you can get.  On the other hand – consider how small a profile this thing would have. The lack of metal would give sensor systems very little to pick up on.  The bizarre shape (for a spaceship) would create initial confusion for anyone seeing if for the first time.  We may be looking at the first ever successful stealth spaceship design.

Astounding Science Fact and Fiction June 1960

Astounding Science Fact and Fiction June 1960

Speaking of cylindrical submarines in space…

Analog January 1970

Analog January 1970

I think the coolest spaceships are the ones that actually go into space.

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First -

HELP! The Interocitor Has De-Coupled From the

Non-Synchronous Fribulator!

If anyone can offer some help with converting my blog from WordPress.com to WordPress.org (hosted on my own site) I’d appreciate it.  I’m a non-CMS, non-PHP, non-CSS kind of person and I seem to be having some difficulties with: modifying the page template, adding widgets and transferring both comments and links from the old site (here) to the new one.

I will gladly plug you/your services for a suitable period. 

I need to take this blog to the next level – ad support, pinging of technorati and other traffic-increasing services & etc.

In the meantime – I’ll keep posting here.

And now -

THE TOP TEN COOLEST

 

SF PULP MAGAZINE

 

SPACESHIPS

I love spaceships.  Find me a science fiction fan who doesn’t.  Such a creature does not exist. 

Next to B.E.M.s, rayguns and scantily clad women in peril (there’s a new SF acronym for you – SCWIPs!), spaceships are about as iconic as you can get.

I went through a lot of agony whittling this list down to just ten.  I could have put a hundred up here and still had some left over, but whittle I did.  Not enough to get down to only ten though, so I had to break things up into a Pre-’50s Top Ten and a Post-50’s Top Ten (TWO top ten lists for the price of one) and here they both are, starting in chronological order: 

The Top Ten (Pre-1950) COOLEST SF Pulp Magazine Spaceships -

Amazing Stories February 1928

Amazing Stories February 1928

The FIRST death star.  Proportionally about the same size too.  Hmmmm.

 

Science Wonder Quarterly Fall 1929

Science Wonder Quarterly Fall 1929

Pretty – and note the ship’s name – ferryman of the styx.  (The scale is revealed by the astronaut walking ON the hull.)

 

Amazing Stories April 1943

Amazing Stories April 1943

 

I love the sense of scale in this cover.  The robot isn’t too bad either.

Astounding Stories August 1934

Astounding Stories August 1934

You simply CAN NOT talk about spaceships without at least one mention of the Skylark – the worlds first interstellar cruiser!

 

Astounding Science Fiction July 1938

Astounding Science Fiction July 1938

I featured this cover in my Pulp Comic Fairy Tale.  Obviously it has made an impression.  I think there are two elements that do it for me – first, the sheer size of the ship itself and second, the contrast of this enormous space liner dwarfed by the starfield behind it.

 

Astounding Science Fiction February 1939

Astounding Science Fiction February 1939

No gallery of pulp cover spaceships is complete without a CRASHED spaceship.  I like the detail of the grave and the angled escape ladder.

 

Dynamic Science Storires February 1939

Dynamic Science Storires February 1939

I loved this image the minute I set eyes on it.  This is, in fact, the cover for the first pulp I ever purchased.  Nearly 70 years later the colors are just as vibrant as the day it first hit the stands.

 

Startling Stories November 1939

Startling Stories November 1939

What are spaceships for but to escape the dying Earth (or colonize new worlds)? This issue of Startling is most notable for the appearance of Weinbaum’s first (and most famous) story. 

I like how over-sized the lions on the left are.  I guess the people up front don’t have tickets.

 

Astounding Science Fiction May 1945

Astounding Science Fiction May 1945

I think this cover appeals because the story it depicts is one of my all time favorites – THE seminal tale of our first contact with an alien species.  Which of the two ship’s do you think is the Terran one?

 

New Worlds January 1949

New Worlds January 1949

This is such a pulpy spaceship. The sense of power, and the sense of wonder come right through.

Later today – Post 1950s Spaceship covers.

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The cover of the first issue of Cosmos Science Fiction and Fantasy magazine recreates the flag raising on Iwo Jima in a science fictional setting.

I’m very familiar with this cover because that issue is both a Volume 1 Number 1 issue and contains a short story by A. Bertram Chandler.  Which I was pleased to discover when I went on a hunt for ‘everything Chandler’, since I had already owned a copy.  Now I dither over whether to keep it with the magazine section of the library or with the Chandler ‘special collection’.

Anyhow, I was pretty sure I had seen a similar scene elsewhere on another SF pulp magazine and eventually I discovered that I was correct.  More than once.

The Iwo Jima flag raising has been honored on multiple occassions.  So here are those covers:

Jeez.  Looks like EVERYONE wants the moon.

That’s a Soviet Union flag, in case you’re too young to recognize it.  They used to be the bad guys until Ronald Reagan crushed them with beam weapons from space. Kinda. Sorta.

 

The F&SF cover isn’t strictly a flag, but close enough to the theme, I think. The Unknown Worlds cover is also a slight take-off, doing a variation on a scene from the John Wayne film Sands of Iwo Jima (I think).

and now the rest of the flag raisings – whimsy first:

now a bit more patriotic -

 

 And finally, in honor of the anniversary of September 11th, these last three:

 

*The IF cover’s flag says “TANSTAAFL” – There Ain’t No Such Thing As A Free Lunch. Including freedom.

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